Tag Archives: Atari A to Z

Atari A to Z: Realm of Impossibility

Electronic Arts are pretty widely disliked by much of the gaming community these days, so it’s easy to forget their somewhat humble and interesting roots.

As their name suggests, they favoured releasing titles that were highly interesting and creative — artistic, you might say — rather than just the same old thing we’d seen elsewhere. In many ways, they heralded in one of the earliest eras of the video game “auteur”.

One great example from the early ’80s was Mike Edwards’ Realm of Impossibility, an enhanced and expanded version of Edwards’ earlier game Zombies. This is a non-violent action adventure that tasks you with exploring a variety of isometric dungeons that get increasingly… peculiar in their geometry as the game progresses. Escher would be proud.

Follow Atari A to Z on its own dedicated site here!

Around the Network

Ten days until Christmas! Are you ready? I am, after a flurry of Amazon shopping earlier.

I’m likely going to be taking a few days off from MoeGamer during the holiday season, so from the week after next onwards (i.e. the week that begins with Christmas) updates may be a little intermittent, but I’ll be back on a normal schedule by the new year at the very latest. And with any luck, if my Christmas plans come to fruition, there may be a very special “Episode X” of The MoeGamer Podcast to enjoy — though no promises in that regard just yet.

Anyway, that’s all in the future. What’s been happening in the immediate past? Hit the jump to see what you might have missed this week.

Continue reading Around the Network

Atari ST A to Z: The Light Corridor

At any point in gaming history, it seems that there’s always one particular territory doomed to be singled out for making “weird” games.

What “weird” actually translates to in most circumstances is “interesting, unconventional, subversive and highly creative”; regrettably, while “weird” is undoubtedly a more concise description, it also carries with it somewhat pejorative connotations.

While today Japan tends to be singled out as the “weird” locale of choice, back in the late ’80s and early ’90s, it was France putting out the most creative, unusual and fascinating games on the market, and Infogrames was a leading developer and publisher during this period.

Here’s The Light Corridor, Infogrames’ delightfully abstract 3D take on the traditional “bat and ball” game — an oddly hypnotic experience that, while simple to play, is extremely addictive…

Follow Atari A to Z on its own dedicated site here!

Atari A to Z: Quasimodo

Dem bells, dem bells, dem… blue bells… wait, I think I’m confusing at least two unrelated things there, aren’t I?

Ahem. Anyway. This is Quasimodo by Synapse Software, brought West by U.S. Gold’s early imprint Synsoft. It’s an unusual platform-action game that involves flinging rocks at Bad People climbing ladders, swinging from bell-ropes, swearing at bats and collecting crystals.

And despite its hunchbacked hero, it most certainly is not a clone of the arcade game Hunchback. Give poor old Quasi the respect he deserves!

Follow Atari A to Z on its own dedicated site here!

Atari ST A to Z: Klax

It is the ’90s, and there is time for Klax.

To be fair, there is time for Klax whenever you care to make time for Klax. It is currently 2018, for example, and there is still time for Klax, so I always thought this particular marketing slogan was rather odd. But it was certainly memorable if nothing else, and few would argue that the dude depicted playing Klax on the cover of Tengen and Domark’s Atari ST release of this match-3 puzzler is not a quintessential example of a distinctly ’90s-looking gamer.

Anyway. Klax is one of the earliest puzzle games I recall having a good time with — I actually played it before I played Tetris for the first time, I believe — and it still holds up well today. Though I’m absolutely not as good at it as I used to be. And the Atari Lynx version is better. But this ST version is still worth a look!

Follow Atari A to Z on its own dedicated site here!

Atari A to Z: Pharaoh’s Curse

Pharaoh’s Curse is legitimately one of my favourite games on the Atari 8-bit, and one I frequently revisit to unironically enjoy every so often.

Developed by Steve Coleman, who we last saw at the helm of Mastertronic’s NinjaPharaoh’s Curse is an early example of an open-world 2D action adventure, allowing players to explore 16 screens arranged in a 4×4 grid in an attempt to recover all the awkwardly positioned treasures before escaping.

16 rooms doesn’t sound like much, does it? Well, you clearly haven’t counted on the intervention of the mummy. And the pharaoh. And all the traps. And that stupid bastard absolute penis of a flying thing that always shows up at the worst possible moment. Not that I’m bitter at all, no no no.

Follow Atari A to Z on its own dedicated site here!

Around the Network

Hello again, dear reader. Are you ready for Christmas? I’m not. But then it’s only just December, so despite what popular culture and The Shops would have you believe, it’s only just now getting into the Christmas period.

I’ve been working hard to get the Project Zero series done and dusted and I’m pleased and proud to say that it is finally done! This week saw the final installment of the articles about this fascinating and unusual survival horror series, and I’m delighted that I’ve finally taken the time to enjoy it in its entirety — and will be continuing to enjoy its various postgames over the course of the New Game Plus video series.

That now leaves me some free time for the MoeGamer Awards 2018 throughout December — I still want your suggestions, by the way! — as well as the opportunity to get a head start on whatever I’ll be covering next year. Question is… where to begin?

Continue reading Around the Network